Does self-control affect interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption?

We conducted a systematic review to assess whether individual differences in self-control influence the effectiveness of interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption. 54 studies were included in the review.

Our findings, published in Health Psychology Review, show that 22 studies (41%) did not report differences in intervention effectiveness by self-control, 18 (33%) reported interventions to be less effective in those with low self-control, and 14 (26%) reported interventions to be more effective in those with low self-control. This pattern of findings did not differ from chance. Click on the Read More button for further details on this study.

Does self-control modify the impact of interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption? A systematic review. Stuatz K, Zupan Z, Field M. Marteau TM

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How did Twitter respond to updated UK alcohol guidelines?

In January 2016, the UK’s four Chief Medical Officers released a public consultation regarding updated guidelines for low-risk alcohol consumption. Online search behaviour suggests that the announcement of new alcohol guidelines generated awareness and interest. But what was the nature of the public response?

Our study, published in BMJ Open, examined responses to the updated guidelines using comments made on Twitter. We aimed to identify the source, sentiment, and themes present in over 3,000 tweets made in the week following the announcement of the new guidelines (January 8th -14th, 2016).