Do image-based warning labels reduce selection of sugary drinks by parents for their children?

Our new study published in Preventive Medicine Reports on 23rd October 2018 indicates that placing image-based warning labels on SSBs reduced their selection by participating parents choosing a beverage for their children.

During the study, 2002 parents viewed a selection of sugary and non-sugary drinks online, presented either without a label, a calorie information label or an image-based warning with or without calorie information and were asked to choose one for their child to consume. The proportion of parents selecting a sugary drink was lower when the drinks were presented with an image-based warning, compared to when no label or just calorie information were used. The most effective label included the image of the rotting teeth.

The study indicates that image-based warning labels, especially those illustrating the health consequences of excess sugar consumption, have the potential to reduce the selection of SSBs by parents for their children.

To read the findings of the study in full, click on the link.

Impact of warning labels on sugar-sweetened beverages on parental selection: An online experimental study. Preventive Medicine Reports. E Mantzari, M Vasiljevic, I Turney, M Pilling, T Marteau.

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A qualitative analysis of sugary drink consumers’ perceptions of using smaller compared with larger bottles when given a fixed amount of cola

Sub-dividing a fixed amount of a sugar-sweetened beverage into smaller vs. larger bottles could help curb their consumption but, so far, no studies have tested this possibility. To explore the possible effects of small bottles, we conducted a qualitative study, published in the journal Appetite.

For further details on this research, click on the read more button below.

Does bottle size affect the amount of cola consumed at home?

Does bottle size affect the amount of cola consumed at home?

Sub-diving a fixed amount of a sugar-sweetened beverage in smaller vs larger bottles could help curb their consumption but so far, no studies have tested this possibility.

In our study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, we assessed the feasibility of running a trial on the impact of bottle size on in-home consumption of cola, in which households would receive a set amount of cola each week for four weeks, in bottles of one of four sizes (1500 ml, 1000 ml, 500 ml, or 250 ml).