Alcohol

What is the impact of labelling wine and beer as lower in alcohol strength?

The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of lower strength alcohol labelling on consumption.

We found that the total amount of wine and beer consumed increased as the label on the drink denoted successively lower alcohol strength. Individual differences in drinking patterns and socio-demographic indicators did not affect these results.

Impact of lower strength alcohol labeling on consumption: A randomized controlled trial. Vasiljevic M, Couturier DL, Frings D, Moss AC, Albery IP, Marteau TM, 2018

Access full text

How are low/er strength wine and beer products marketed online?

Our study compared the main marketing messages conveyed by retailers and producers for low/er and regular strength wine and beer products in the UK.

We found that compared with regular strength wines and beers, low/er strength products were more often marketed in association with occasions deemed to be suitable for their consumption including lunchtimes, outdoor events/barbeques, or on sports and fitness occasions.

Access full text

Would increasing the price of sugary soft drinks influence purchases of alcohol?

The UK Government levy on sugary drinks producers began in April 2018, potentially influencing the cost of a large range of non-alcoholic beverages. This study looked at how increasing the price of non-alcoholic drinks could influence purchases of alcoholic drinks,…

Does self-control affect interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption?

We conducted a systematic review to examine whether individual differences in self-control influence the effectiveness of interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption.

Of the 54 studies included in our review, 22 (41%) did not report differences in intervention effectiveness by self-control, 18 (33%) reported interventions to be less effective in those with low self-control, and 14 (26%) reported interventions to be more effective in those with low self-control. This pattern of findings did not differ from chance.

Click on the Read More button for further details on this study.

Does self-control modify the impact of interventions to change alcohol, tobacco, and food consumption? A systematic review. Stautz K, Zupan Z, Field M. Marteau TM

Access full text

Have wine glasses in England got bigger?

Alcohol consumption in England has increased over time, particularly for wine. In a previous study, we found that wine sales in a bar and restaurant increased by almost 10% when wine was served in a larger glass (Pechey et al., 2016 and Pechey et al., 2017). In our new study, published in the BMJ Christmas issue, we examined whether wine glasses in England have increased in size over time, one of several possible influences upon increasing wine consumption in England. To continue reading about our findings click on the Read More button.

Wine glass size in England from 1700 to 2017: A measure of our time. Zupan, Z., Evans, A., Couturier, D.L., Marteau, T.M.

Access full text