Milica Vasiljevic | Behaviour and Health Research Unit

How do different types of e-cigarette adverts affect perceptions of harm from tobacco smoking among children?

In two previous studies, we found that children exposed to e-cigarette adverts perceived occasional tobacco smoking as less harmful than children not exposed to such adverts. In this paper, we replicate and extend these findings using a larger sample, a stronger control condition and an updated meta-analysis.

This study adds to existing evidence that exposing children to adverts for e-cigarettes may reduce how harmful they perceive tobacco smoking to be. Further studies are warranted, using longitudinal and experimental designs, to assess a wider range of possible impacts of the marketing of e-cigarettes including attitudes towards the tobacco industry and tobacco control policies.

E-cigarette Adverts and Children’s Perceptions of Tobacco Smoking Harms: An Experimental Study. Vasiljevic, St John Wallis, Codling, Couturier, Sutton, Marteau, BMJ Open. Access full text.

What is the potential impact of calorie labelling in worksite cafeterias? A pilot study

Reducing excess consumption of food and drink is core to tackling the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in the UK and elsewhere. In this paper we provide the results of a pilot trial estimating the potential impact of calorie labelling on energy purchased across six worksite cafeterias. Post-intervention feedback amongst cafeteria patrons and worksite managers and caterers suggested high levels of acceptability. The predicted effect of labelling to reduce energy purchased was only evident at one out of six sites studied.

Impact of calorie labelling in worksite cafeterias: a stepped wedge randomised controlled pilot trial. Vasiljevic M, Cartwright E, Pilling M, Lee M-M, Bignardi G, Pechey R, Hollands GJ, Jebb SA, Marteau TM, 2018

Access full text

What is the impact of labelling wine and beer as lower in alcohol strength?

The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of lower strength alcohol labelling on consumption.

We found that the total amount of wine and beer consumed increased as the label on the drink denoted successively lower alcohol strength. Individual differences in drinking patterns and socio-demographic indicators did not affect these results.

Impact of lower strength alcohol labeling on consumption: A randomized controlled trial. Vasiljevic M, Couturier DL, Frings D, Moss AC, Albery IP, Marteau TM, 2018

Access full text

How are low/er strength wine and beer products marketed online?

Our study compared the main marketing messages conveyed by retailers and producers for low/er and regular strength wine and beer products in the UK.

We found that compared with regular strength wines and beers, low/er strength products were more often marketed in association with occasions deemed to be suitable for their consumption including lunchtimes, outdoor events/barbeques, or on sports and fitness occasions.

Access full text